Q: Who makes Gronlund guitars and where are they made?

All Gronlund guitars are made by James Greene in a small workshop on the beautiful rural Maine coast.


Q: Do you make left handed guitars?

Absolutely! For the same price as a right handed guitar.


Q: Do you use a CNC machine in the construction of your guitars?

No, not at all. But I have nothing against CNC machines. Many of my guitarmaking peers use them and they are incredible tools. But it just isn't for me. My guitars are truly "handcrafted" in the real sense of the word. I don't want to spend time in front of a computer screen running a CNC machine. I would rather do every bit of it by hand. I use paper and pencil in the drafting of all of my designs and everything is built from scratch from rough cut kiln dried hardwood. I use hand tools such as files, rasps, spokeshaves and chisels and power tools such as routers, bandsaws, tablesaws and belt sanders in the building process and am proud to carry on in this old school manner.


Q: What are your current wait times for custom builds?

At this time I can generally have most custom builds completed in 8 to 12 weeks.


Q: What kind of hardware do you use?

I use what I consider to be the best hardware available. Schroeder, Tonepros, Mastery, Grover, ABM and Bigsby.


Q: How do you package a guitar for shipping and what is the price of shipping?

I've put a lot of time into deciding the best and safest way to ship a guitar. I use oversized 8"x20"x50" corrugated boxes reinforced with plywood sides which adds a huge amount of strength. The guitar is in it's case with many inches of padding on all sides. Shipping will generally be $75 within the USA and $135 international.


Q: Can I change specifications on my custom build along the way?

Maybe. If the item in the building process that you're interesting in changing hasn't already been completed then I can likely accomodate any such updates. It's best to have a confident set of specs to begin with that you know you wont want to change. But if you do change your mind on something definitely don't be afraid to ask!


Q: Are your necks scarf jointed or one piece?

I use a scarf joint for all necks. It's a much stronger and more stable way to build a neck because it keeps the wood grain oriented in the correct direction as shown in this illustration. This is a cross section view of a one piece tilt back neck compared to a scarf jointed tilt back neck. The parrallel lines represent the grain. The one piece non scarf jointed neck will have a lot of endgrain runout in the headstock which makes it weaker and much more prone to breaking. The scarf jointed neck remedies this flaw and all grain is focused in the correct direction. This adds substantial strength and a creates a better neck.




Q: What degree are your tiltback headstocks?

12 Degrees!


Q: What types of wood do you build with and where do you get it?

I mostly use North American hardwoods such as Swamp Ash, Hard Maple, Black Walnut, Claro Walnut, Redwood, Koa, Cedar and Alder. I also use Mahogany, Rosewood and Ebony from time to time. But I love to use good old American lumber because it makes the most sense to me. Much of the lumber I use for tops is salvaged old growth. All of the Redwood in particular is harvested from 1500+ year old downed Redwood trees which once stood 20' or more in diameter and towered over 400' tall. I find that to be incredible. I get all of my lumber in rough cut kiln dried form from these great suppliers: Rare Woods USA, Kings Mountain Hardwood and Oregon Wild Wood


Q: What type of tone capacitors do you use?

I use Emerson Custom 0.022uf 300v paper in oil tone capacitors.




Q: What kind of strings do you use?

I am now proud to use Stringjoy strings for all guitars. This is a fantastic company and they manufacture all of their strings in Nashville, Tennessee.


Q: What does the small stamped number on the back of my headstock mean?

My serial numbers are very simple. They are numbered in chronological order starting with 001 and working up from there. So, for example, if you have 062 then you have the 62nd guitar I built. A few of the early guitars were not numbered. If you have one and are curious what number it is just shoot a photo on over to me and I can tell you all about it!


Q: What do you use for a finish on your guitars?

My guitars are finished with a very thin nitrocellulose lacquer. I mostly spray satin nitro which allows you to spray even thinner than a high gloss finish which requires many coats of build before buffing. Most of my guitars also have an open grain finish on the back, sides and neck and only the top has it's grain filled and is leveled flat. This all allows an incredibly light protective finish which helps allow the guitar to resonate to it's fullest potential. Some of the early guitars have a thin polyurathane, varnish or pre cat lacquer.


Q: How do you accept payment?

I use Paypal for pretty much everything because it's safe, fast and convenient. Paypal invoices can be paid any any major credit card. For custom builds I accept 50% payment at the time custom specs are submitted and the remaining 50% at the time of the guitars completion.


Q: Do you offer a warranty with your guitars?

Yes! See the About section for full details.